NORVAX: Driving Sales Through Technology

May 17, 2007 :: Volume 7, Issue 5 :: 1-866-466-7829

Insurance Agent Newsletter

May Index

.: Your Guide to Online PR
.: Agent Interview: Steve Blossom, Atlas Health
.: What Does Your Email Font Say About You?
.: Ask The Expert: Should I Swap Email Lists?
.: Get More Out of Google
.: Norvax Product News

Previous Issues

 

May Index

.: Feature Article: Your Guide to Online PR
.: Agent Interview: Steve Blossom, Atlas Health
.: What Does Your Email Font Say About You?
.: Ask The Expert: Should I Swap Email Lists?
.: Get More Out of Google
.: Norvax Product News

Previous Issues

What Does Your Email Font Say About You?

As an agent, you want to project a professional image in all of your interactions with prospects - including your emails.

A study conducted last fall by Wichita State University found that the choice of font can impact the impression you make on your email readers.

The study tested several popular fonts for "appropriateness" in a business communication.

Depending on your choice, you may come across as youthful, rebellious, unstable, less trustworthy or less professional. Not exactly what you intended.

Here's how the fonts stacked up, from most appropriate to least:

  1. Calibri - highly appropriate
  2. Corbel
  3. Candara
  4. Cambria
  5. Verdana
  6. Arial
  7. Times New Roman
  8. Constantia
  9. Georgia
  10. Century Gothic
  11. Comic Sans - moderately appropriate

The fonts that rounded out the list as "least appropriate" were Gigi, Rockwell Extra Bold and Impact.

The lower a font ranked in appropriateness, the more likely a reader was to assume the writer was a lower level trainee employee, and less mature.

The takeaway from the study: your font choice may create an unprofessional first impression if you're not careful. Steer clear of playful, "novelty" fonts that may not truly represent your level of experience.

While Calibri ranked highest in the Wichita survey, it's not available on everyone's computer. Fortunately, nearly everyone has several of the other high-scorers, including Verdana, Arial, and Times New Roman.

How do you decide which to use?

On one hand, you want your font to say something about you. Generally, sans-serif fonts such as Arial convey a more "contemporary" feeling, while serif fonts such as Times New Roman feel more "classical."

On the other hand, you have to consider your audience. Not all fonts are equally readable - especially on a computer screen. Fonts with wider, more open shapes - including Verdana and Georgia - are easier to read. If you frequently send emails to an older audience, consider using one of these "easy on the eyes" fonts.

Source: http://psychology.wichita.edu/surl/usabilitynews/91/POF.html

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